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How Reading Improves Seniors Quality of Life

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Although extremely advantageous, natural reading is very often a neglected activity, especially in the 21stcentury. These days, people prefer to spend free time doing pretty much anything other than reading as they already spend too much of their workday in front of a computer, reading, skimming through stuff, writing emails and whatnot. Practically, all they want to do is rest their eyes for a while, and we get that.

 

Unfortunately, there’s no middle in this praxis. It seems that other media has replaced our former glorious obsession with reading altogether, because it is easier to digest in the current climate of burnout, too much information, and screen blindness. But, in all truth – nothing beats reading and all the benefits that come with it, to people of all ages. Reading is not only fantastic for kidsbut the elderly as well, for the reasons we are about to list below:

 

The Health Benefits of Reading

 

Life of a senior can indeed be stressful. Health problems and family worries wear a person out. And at an advanced age, stress can be costly. To the rescue comes the book, which is a real treasure during difficult times. A good novel can take you to different places and different times and distract you from your worries. It helps you to take a deep breath and face problems calmly.

 

Many studies have shown a connection between reading and mental health. Reading as an everyday activity can reduce memory decline by 30%. The scientists have also discovered that brain stimulation provided by learning or solving puzzles minimizes the probability of having Alzheimer’s disease. Another excellent benefit of reading is that it improves the quality of sleep. Anxiety, pain, and side effects of medications can make falling and staying asleep very difficult. Reading before bedtime is a perfect way to help your brain slow down and tell your body that it’s time for its well-deserved rest.

 

Reading as a Sparkle That Boosts Your Spirit

 

Besides influencing your health positively, reading can enrich your life. It’s a great way to spend free time. It’s a perfect pastime for retired people, making their day more exciting and amusing. A person is never too old to learn new things, and there’s no better way to do it than scrutinizing scientific breakthroughs, art catalogs, or encyclopedias. Additionally, books improve a person’s vocabulary which, then, increases self-esteem.

 

When it comes to choosing your literature, reading anything is better than reading nothing, but we recommend classics. Everybody loves a good story, and the world’s most celebrated novels are the best stories ever told. They will stir up your imagination, help you develop empathy, and broaden your perspective on life.

 

 

 

Modern Tools That Enhance the Reading Experience

 

Reading can be a challenge for senior citizens who have vision issues or find it hard to stay in a sitting position continuously. Luckily, audiobooks have come to the rescue. A lot of them can download from the internet but also found on YouTube. Podcasts are another great way to entertain your brain and give it something to do. E-books are useful as well because the size of letters and the screen brightness can be adjusted.

 

No Matter What, Reading Should Be a Habit

 

Reading is a high activity that helps usfeel better physically, but also mentally. A good book is especially beneficial for senior citizens because it entertains the brain and helps it work properly. At the same time, reading makes life more cheerful and opens new horizons. So, please do yourself a favor and grab that book right away!

 

Check out Progressive Risingfor more information on the best books, the importance of reading, and everything else in between.

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4 Book Marketing Tips You’ll Find Useful

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These days, everything’s online – including books. And, even if they’re not online per se, you need to market them online for the hard copies to get purchased at all. If you’ve been in the game for a while, you know how tough, challenging and time-consuming book marketing can be, don’t you? Ah, we all do. And, if you are new and enthusiastic – you’ll soon find out.

So, how are you going to market your book? Here are four ideas.

  1. Create a Compelling Brand Identity

Long gone are days when there were only a few authors to publish in a year. In the 21st century, the century of blogs and opinions, everyone’s a potential author and – if you want your book to sell – you need to stand out.

The truth is, writers are no longer just writers – they are walking and talking brands who need to market themselves if they want to be remembered. So, brand yourself in a way that resonates with your target audience and tells a story of who you are as a person and a writer. For instance, if you describe yourself as A Cab Driver Who Writes Books, or The Mother of Three – Criminal, Judge, and Writer – that’ll certainly attract people who either find your description (brand) exciting or see a little bit of themselves in it.

 

  1. Don’t Try to Sell – Try to Market Your Book

Selling is not marketing, especially not on social media! Forget the phrases like ‘Check out my book,’ ‘Buy my book,’ and ‘My book is free today’ because they’ll make you look, well, pathetic. Instead, interact to get known, post intelligent comments, be witty, be memorable, be worth reading.

  1. Blog Often But Don’t Spam

Newsflash: writing a book isn’t enough. With the competition as strong as it is and so many amazing authors to follow on social media, you need to keep reminding people of yourself and the work you do. So, make sure you blog as often as possible about your book to catch the reader’s interest. You can also write posts thematically related to your book, and then cleverly include it in the post.

For instance, if you wrote a book titled: My Childhood: How I Escaped from a Cult? And you are writing a post about, say, the elements of occultism, include a sentence like “In my book My Childhood: How I Escaped from a Cult? I talk extensively about reactions of the human psyche in the circumstances that…” etc. The point is: keep (subtly) reminding the readers of your book. Plus, writing about your book will get social media attention and make you discoverable on Google.

  1. Be Resourceful With Your Profiles

Set up accounts on Goodreads, AuthorDen, Shelfari or other social media sites related to books. Even places like Google+, Stumbleupon, Pinterest, and Facebook can work. Get notified through Google Alert every time your name lists on a new search engine entry. Since you are marketing yourself as an author, write an original bio for these sites – give your potential readers the reason to find out more about you.

For all the new authors, here’s a closing word of caution: gear up and get ready to face up a lot of arduous self-promotion and hard work before you get anywhere. But, do pair up with Progressive Rising Phoenix if you want to get the best independent publisher for your work, and get to the finish line quicker than you thought possible!

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How to Hook Readers on the First Few Sentences or Paragraph

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Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself, wrote Virginia Wolf. Leo Tolstoy observed that Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Margaret Atwood made it clear that Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space while Charles Dickens wondered Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. Brilliant.

So, what do these lines have in common except that we’re quoting (and remembering) them decades after they were written? They were (and still are) extraordinary novel openers we cannot get over. And that’s precisely what you want to accomplish, too.

But, how does a writer in the 21st century go about writing catchy openers and pieces that stick when, these days, virtually every content is chewed, digested, and spat out quicker than it was written?

In a climate that encourages everyone to speak their minds and share their content, you need to make sure your stuff is powerful enough to become worth remembering.

Apart from mastering these Must-Read Books That Will Make You a Better Writer, here’s how to hook readers:

Begin at a Pivotal Moment

In a novel – intrigue is everything. The reader is more likely to want to continue to read if you start your piece with a critical moment in the story.

“I became what I am today at the age of twelve, on a frigid overcast day in the winter of 1975.” Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

Make Your Readers Wonder

There’s something mind-bending about a plot you can’t understand straight away. When you put a question in your readers’ minds, you’ve done the most important thing – got their attention and made them want to read more. What’s going to happen? What do those first lines mean? You’ll keep them reading the more you make them wonder.

“Those old cows knew trouble was coming before we did.” – Jeannette Walls, Half Broke Horses: A True-Life Novel

Start in Medias Res

When you begin with something happening, you immediately catch the reader’s attention and make them wonder what next is going to happen, who the characters are, what’s the background, etc. and you successfully build suspense without even getting to the plot.

“You better not never tell nobody but God.” Alice Walker, The Color Purple

Introduce an Intriguing Character

The reader will, no doubt, be much more interested in a story if there’s a character they find fascinating. Draw your readers into a story’s narrative by starting it with a captivating plotline and an out of the ordinary character.

“I was born twice: first as a baby girl on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974.” Jeffrey Eugenides, Middlesex

Begin with a Compelling Narrative Voice

Make your first words effective by opening the story with the voice of a narrator. The moment your readers identify with the narrator, that’s when you get their undivided attention. It’s best to start with the first person:

“I am ninety. Or ninety-three. One or the other.”  Sara Gruen, Water for Elephants

 

Great opening lines are fantastic tools to pull the writers in; however, don’t put all of your eggs in one basket. If your few first lines are spectacular and most of your content weak, they won’t continue reading. Keep your content strong at all times. Visit Progressive Rising Phoenix to learn how.

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10 Best Book-to-Film Adaptations of All Time

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It comes as no surprise that some of the highest-grossing movies in history are film adaptations of popular or award-winning titles. The stories are so compelling and entertaining that it makes perfect sense that they would make successful screenplays.

Here are ten of the best book-to-film adaptations of all time based on popularity, reception, cultural impact, and ticket sales:

 

  • Harry Potter series

 

It was inevitable that J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series would turn into equally successful movies. Book sales and movie sales are almost equal as the book series earned $7.7 billion while the film grossed about $8.5 billion, including the latest installment, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

 

  • Mrs. Doubtfire

 

The 1993 movie Mrs. Doubtfire starring Robin Williams grossed $441.29 million worldwide. But did you know that it was based on the book “Madame Doubtfire” by British author Anne Fine?

 

  • The Lord of the Rings Trilogy

 

The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy novel by J.R.R. Tolkien published in 1954. The story was released as three movies starting with The Fellowship of the Ring in 2001. It followed with The Two Towers and The Return of the King. The three installments would not only gain a pop culture following of epic proportions but grossing close to $1 billion each.

 

  • The Princess Bride

 

Domestically, the Princess Bride grossed $30.86 million. It surprises many to learn that the movie developed by the 1973 book of the same name written by William Goldman.

 

  • Jurassic Park

 

The Jurassic Park franchise has grossed a little under $5 billion at the worldwide box office with the first in the series earning $1 billion alone. But before Jurassic Park became the phenomena that continues to release movies 25 years after the initial installment, it was a novel written by Michael Crichton.  

 

  • Forrest Gump

 

Many don’t realize that before there was a Forrest Gump movie starring Tom Hanks, there was a Forrest Gump book written by Winston Groom. The novel released in 1986 and the movie hit theaters in 1994. While the story only sold an estimated 30,000 copies, the film grossed an incredible $677.9 million worldwide.

 

  • The Hobbit Trilogy

 

While J.R.R. Tolkien wrote The Hobbit first, The Lord of the Rings was adapted into movies first. Due to their massive success and the public clamoring for more movies based on Tolkien’s epic novels, The Hobbit Trilogy released. The Hobbit films would add another $2.91 billion to the franchise.

 

  • The Hunger Games

 

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins is a trilogy that adapted into a 4-part movies series. The Hunger Games earned its spot as one of the highest-grossing film franchises with ticket sales of over $2.9 billion worldwide.

 

  • The Twilight Saga

 

Worldwide, the Twilight Saga based on the four novels by Stephanie Meyer grossed $3.3 billion.  The vampire-themed fantasy novels were a huge success, winning multiple awards including the 2009 Kids’ Choice Award for Favorite Book. By 2011, the series has sold over 120 million copies.

 

  • Shrek

 

The animated movie Shrek grossed a whopping $484.41 million worldwide. Its sequel Shrek 2 picked up more than $919 million. Shrek was based on a 1990 children’s picture book titled “Shrek!” by William Steig.

Are you an author of a YA fiction or children’s picture books? Your novel could be the next phenomenal book that gets adapted into a blockbuster hit! Check out Progressive Rising Phoenix’s new releases and read what could be the next book-to-film adaption.

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The 5 Characteristics All Great Authors Have in Common

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“To thine own self be true.” – William Shakespeare

From J.K. Rowling’s “rags to riches” journey with the Harry Potter series to George R.R. Martin‘s Game of Thrones phenomenon, it fascinates us to learn what it is about authors that help them reach their levels of success.

What makes some writers more successful than others? When it comes to becoming an award-winning novelist, is being exceptional at spinning stories and impeccable grammar enough?

Do you have what it takes to be a great writer?

While each writer’s story is different, we have discovered that there are specific characteristics that all successful authors have in common. Here are the top five qualities that make a writer great:

 

  • Self-Discipline

 

Great authors need the discipline to stick to a schedule. While it’s true that many writers need to wait to be inspired, writers typically motivate themselves, committed to writing a specified amount such as a chapter over a defined amount of time. Writers work unsupervised; therefore, they know that it’s up to them to monitor their productivity. They know to avoid procrastination. Because writer’s block is something writers dread the most, they know to not stop when they’re “on a roll.”

 

  • Good Researchers

 

While some authors write from experience or a vision in their head, many turn to proper old-fashioned research to form their ideas or make their writing more accurate; even some fiction is based on facts.

 

  • Problem Solvers

 

Successful and productive writers know they can’t let their egos get in the way. They realize they will hit roadblocks and may require help at some point. They recognize that the best way to stay productive is to seek help when needed. It could be in the form of a mentor, a second pair of eyes, someone to listen, or even tools that check spelling and grammar. While writers are expected to be great at spelling and grammar, you’d be surprised by how many aren’t. Many often have to go back and correct their writing or have an editor look over their work.

 

  • Vision

 

Some authors say their stories write themselves. But for most writers, their process starts with a view. Without writing a single word, they know who the key players are in their story. They see the theme and the setting. They know what the central conflict is and the resolution.

 

  • Passion for Reading

 

There’s nothing wrong with being moved by someone else’s words. Most authors are inspired to become writers because of a love for reading. Reading and writing complement each other. Like artists and other creatives, the work of favorite writers often inspires their writing. By reading others work, they can recognize lousy writing and identify different styles of writing. The more you read to learn, the more you develop self-awareness of the kind of writer you are and ultimately, want to become.

If you’re an aspiring writer and need inspiration, Progressive Rising Phoenix has a vast variety of award-winning titles in mystery, suspense, action, adventure, fantasy, romance, historical fiction, and sci-fi. Contact us today, and we’ll help get you started.

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How Does Reading Affect Your Brain?

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We know that reading sparks our imagination. A reading experience that is immersive enough has the power make our mind burst with imagery and fill us with emotions. Well-written stories can make us laugh or cry. They can anger or inspire us. Our minds take off, and we envision we are in the setting of the story, existing as one of the key players. We become invested in the lives of the characters, cheering for our favorites.

But have you ever wondered what happens to our brains when we read? Is there a physical reaction going on in our minds whenever we read?

Heightens Connectivity in the Brain

The truth is that our brains do fascinating things when we read. Neuroscientists have discovered that reading can stimulate our minds when what we read is compelling enough. In a study on the Short- and Long-Term Effects of a Novel on Connectivity in the Brain, researchers sought to determine whether reading a novel causes measurable changes in the brain. For 19 consecutive days, participants read pages from a book, during which functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tracks changes in the resting-state brain activity. The results of the research proved that there are long-term changes in brain connectivity. Connections were identified to increase in strength during story days, remaining elevated even after reading.

Increase Brain’s Activity for Memory

Reading stimulates your brain, keeping it engaged. And because reading improves brain function, it is considered one of the best exercises for your mind as it positively affects mental, cognitive tasks like reasoning and memory. The novels you read are full of different elements, forcing you to remember character names, descriptions, events, and settings. Therefore, the more you try to recall what you read, the more you work your mind.

In a study conducted by the National Academy of Sciences, researchers discovered how reading influences the brain on a chemical level. It stimulates the mind, training our imagination and giving our brain a workout. And just like regular exercise for the body, reading keeps your brain healthy. The healthier it is, the more you avoid cognitive decline and the better your short- and long-term memory. Reading is believed to be so beneficial to cognitive health that it is considered to help you prevent Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Alters Brain Tissue

There’s evidence that serious reading can cause the brain to create white matter. White matter refers to the areas of the central nervous system that act as “highways” carrying information throughout your mind. Gray matter, on the other hand, relates to tissues that process and store information. The research by scientists from Carnegie Mellon University uncovered the first evidence that reading alters brain tissue, causing the brain to rewire itself physically. With the creation of new white matter, communication within the brain improves. Therefore, the more you read, the more you help build your mind to carry information.

If you’re ready to start exercising and building your brain, Progressive Rising Phoenix has excellent titles to keep you entertained, and your mind stimulated.

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Make Reading an Enjoyable Part of Your Kid’s Life by Creating a Home Library

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We all want our kids to read more – and to love reading, but we often lack strategies to make learning enjoyable for them. Reading should be a pleasant, relaxing part of everyday life and it is our role as parents to create the proper reading environment for our children. You need to encourage your child to read at home. To do so, make a comfortable and inviting place for your kid to curl up with their books.

When you set up a home library, you send a strong message that reading is an integral part of family life and that it isn’t reserved exclusively for schools and libraries.

A home library doesn’t necessarily need to take up much space – a corner in your kid’s room may do the trick entirely. All you need is a bookcase, books, and a hint of creativity.

Here are several suggestions for creating a cozy reading area that will spark your child’s creativity and make reading a beloved, enjoyable part of their everyday life:

Choose the Right Spot

Think about a place in your house that would be perfect for keeping and reading books. It should be a cozy, inviting space that makes learning a relaxing activity. Put out soft pillows for your child to snuggle on while reading their favorite story. Make sure the lighting is good for reading.

Put Books Within Reach

Your child is not your height so you should put the books within their reach. Make sure to use low, sturdy shelves to enable your child to select the books they want to read quickly. It is crucial for the racks to be safe for the child, so it is out of the question to have them climbing on a chair or the shelf to reach books.

Rotate the Books Regularly

Have regular rotations by changing the books on display. This way you encourage your child to read new stories instead of continually sticking to cherished favorites. There is nothing wrong with your child having a favorite book, but helping them to explore new writers and new literary worlds is very important.

Put Your Child’s Interests First

When you start filling your child’s home library, include books, magazines, and catalogs that cover topics that are of interest to them. The child’s teacher or the local librarian can be of great help when it comes to finding books on particular subjects. Does your kid love motorcycles? Buy a book about the history of Harley-Davidson, or buy fresh motorcycle magazine issues. What the child wants, the child should get – in a reading form.

Extend the Reading Experience

You should encourage your child to retell the stories in creative ways. Provide them with crayons, a flannel board or any other art materials so they can express and retell parts of the book in their cozy home library area.

Building a home library for your children will encourage their reading activities, and it will help incorporate storytelling into their life from an early age. Visit Progressive Rising Phoenix to choose from a wide variety of interesting books for your child’s home library!

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Fun Ways to Enhance Children’s Literacy and Encourage Reading

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In today’s fast-moving world filled with technology and all kinds of distractions, parents often struggle to find ways to spark interest in reading books in children. While it’s true that technology is terrific on many levels, it is also very addictive. Encouraging the development of children’s literacy is very important, and it is in your child’s best interest to recognize the benefits of reading from early ages.

Here is a list of fun activities that allow you to incorporate reading into your child’s life seamlessly:

Introduce Your Kids to Reading Challenges

Family reading challenges help develop teamwork, goal setting, and determination in children. Working as a family to complete a particular problem will innovate your child’s way of thinking when it comes to shared responsibility and teamwork.

When you make reading a challenge, it automatically becomes more interesting for kids. Decide as a team which book you are going to learn, set a deadline and track your progress. Celebrate each family member’s success. There are many exciting challenges your children are going to love. Try the Bookshelf Scavenger Hunt or Reading Bingo.  

Bring a Story to Life

Children will feel more connected to a book if you bring some part of its story to life. Choose a recipe from one of the books and make a family dinner out of it. Let a book inspire you to create a piece of art as a family, or do an act of kindness you read about in a book. Try out a new activity described in your kid’s favorite book, or visit a city where a particular story took place.

Bringing a book to life gives the reading experience a new dimension, and it makes the children feel a stronger bond with the story.

Schedule Regular Visits to Free Libraries

Free libraries are everywhere, and you probably have at least one near you.  Most libraries have free books for you and your children to read. The principle is wonderfully simple: you take a book, and you leave a book. Visit the Little Free Library website to discover a list of registered small free libraries in your community.

Feel the Magic of Campfire Stories

There is no better way of spending time together as a family than with storytelling. It is without the distraction of tech gadgets and an excellent way of teaching the kids about the elements of a story. Organize family storytelling; build a bonfire, or pretend you and the kids are sitting around a campfire.

Tell make-believe or true stories to each other and encourage your children to tell their stories in detail. It will help them learn about the structure of a story and the proper way to tell a tale.

Go on Outdoor Literacy Walks

Many StoryWalk® exhibits are popping out across communities. They allow your family to walk through a book literally. The pages of a book are deconstructed and hung along a trail. Typically, you can find them in outdoor places, like parks. You can see an exhibit near you by contacting your local library.

Visit Progressive Rising Phoenix for many interesting books for your children!

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Why You Should Read to Your Unborn Baby

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Reading to your unborn baby brings many benefits – both for the parent and the baby. The relaxation and bonding you feel when you share reading time with your baby are undeniable. Did you know that, according to science, reading to a baby in the womb helps the baby develop early language learning?

It is well-known that reading helps with language development and word recognition in small children. It creates a positive bond between the child and the parent, providing a special unity feeling before bedtime. Knowing that all of these also apply to unborn babies in the womb gives you the ability to get a step ahead of bonding with your child, and preparing them for the outside world.

Let’s list the most important advantages of reading to your unborn baby:  

Reading to Your Unborn Baby Might Make the Baby Smarter

The University of Oregon conducted a study during which they gave pregnant mothers a recording containing a made-up word which they would play to their baby near the end of pregnancy. After they were born, the babies were able to recognize the made-up word and some of its variations. They measured the neural signals the babies emitted to show that they realized the sounds of the fake word. The most cogent response came from the babies who heard the recording most frequently.

In conclusion, the study suggests that infant language learning begins before the baby is born.

Reading to Your Unborn Baby Reduces Maternal Stress

Many studies show reading to your baby in the womb causes the baby’s heart rate to drop, mainly when it’s coming from the mother’s soft, relaxing voice. Reading to your baby doesn’t only help the baby relax, it also helps reduce maternal stress. It will help you relax and slow down, and thoroughly enjoy the early fun moments of parenting and bonding with your child. Nothing reduces stress as much as happiness and love do.

Bonding With Your Unborn Baby Through Reading

Even while your baby is still in the womb, you can experience the bond that usually starts developing after the child is born. All that it takes is for mommy and daddy to read to their baby prenatally. Reading is also a fantastic way for other family members to bond with the baby.

Very often we get caught up in preparing for new life on the practical side, that we forget about the benefits of early attention to the child. Reading to your unborn baby builds a fantastic foundation for future loving relationships.

The Best Books For Your Unborn Baby

It is the process of prenatal reading that matters more than the type of book you choose. However, you apparently shouldn’t read a mystery novel or a thriller while trying to bond with your unborn baby. Reading to your baby should be relaxing and loving, and not stressful in any way. The best books to choose are classic children’s books with cheerful characters and exciting stories. Choose a traditional book or a contemporary, funny fairy tale – whichever you find more interesting. The important thing is to feel calm and loving during the reading process, and you can rest assured it will benefit both you and the baby.

Visit Progressive Rising Phoenix and choose the most heartwarming books to read to your unborn baby!

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How Reading Can Help Your Career

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Reading books isn’t the most popular activity nowadays. We live in the age of technology, where information is always available and thrown at us. We read the news online, we interact with our friends online, and we even listen to music online. The importance of reading a good book seems to have faded over the recent years.

Instead of reading, we often choose to watch Netflix shows, and as much as watching TV can be great, reading is an activity that can help you improve various skills. It enables you to make the most of your naturally given talents, and it helps you develop some new skills that are exclusive to reading.

Let’s talk about ways reading can help you career-wise:

Reading Helps You Beat Stress

Losing yourself in a great book swipes away all the stress of everyday life. A great story will transfer you to another world; it will capture your attention and bring you to another dimension, allowing you to explore different cultures and realms. On the other hand, an engaging article will help you de-stress while keeping you in the present, and providing satisfying new information. It will allow you to relax and let tensions disappear.

The University of Sussex conducted a study, and it revealed that reading might reduce stress by up to 68 percent. It reduces stress better and faster than other popular methods, such as listening to music or drinking tea. A book invites your mind into a different world where the stress triggers from your everyday life don’t exist.

Reading Makes You Smarter

Reading fills your mind with new information. You’re getting more insight into the human psychology, into different cultures, different eras, or countries. The more knowledge and insight you have the better prepared you will be for any challenge that comes your way.

It doesn’t matter what your profession is, or whether you are a janitor or a CEO, more knowledge makes you smarter and sharper. Reading books about your industry will give you the necessary knowledge and confidence to move forward with your career. No matter where you want to get, you will get there faster if you read more.

The More You Read – The Better Your Analytic Skills

You should think of reading as an exercise for the brain. It can force you to get into it and think forward, backward, and sideways. You would be surprised what a good mystery novel can do to your analytical skills. When reading a fascinating book with a lot of mystery in it, your mind is always taking mental notes, trying to remember every specific detail.

Reading Enriches Your Vocabulary

When you read a book, you get exposed to a new world filled with new words and phrases. No two writers are entirely alike. The more you read, the more words you keep seeing and many of these words will make their way into your vocabulary.

Every profession needs people who are well-spoken and articulate. Being able to communicate with a rich vocabulary gives you credibility and enhances your self-confidence.

Visit Progressive Rising Phoenix to explore many exciting titles and start working on your professional skills right now!